Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Legal Writing Handbook

Brooklyn Law School Library’s Technical Services Department has released the September 8, 2010 New Book List. Of interest to the incoming class of 1Ls is the newly published Fifth Edition of Legal Writing Handbook: Practice Book by Laurel Currie Oates & Anne Enquist (Call #KF250 .O182 2010).

The Legal Writing Practice Book is the companion to the Fifth Edition of The Legal Writing Handbook: Analysis, Research, and Writing, which covers the key components of the first-year course Fundamentals of Law Practice I: Writing, Analysis, Research and Skills. Both items are on reserve at the Circulation Desk.

The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) abstract for the Legal Writing Handbook says that this item is actually 7 books in one. “Book 1 is an introduction to legal writing that includes an introduction to the U.S. legal system and an introduction to legal reading and analysis. Book 2 describes the basics of legal research, and it is accompanied by an Electronic Supplement that demonstrates step-by-step how to do legal research in the most recently updated electronic sources, including free sources and WestlawNext. Book 3 provides step-by-step instruction in writing objective memos, opinion letters, email, and text messages. Book 4 provides step-by-step instruction in writing motion and appellate briefs and making effective oral arguments. Book 5 provides in-depth instruction on writing effectively with numerous examples. Book 6 provides in-depth instruction on writing correctly, again with numerous examples. Book 7 discusses both grammatical and rhetorical issues that English-as-a-second-language law students often face. The Legal Writing Handbook, Fifth Edition has an accompanying website with teaching materials for professors who adopt the book, an online diagnostic exam for grammar and punctuation that is self-grading and sends students to the sections of the book they need to review, and a companion Practice Book that provides numerous exercises for students to do to reinforce the skills they have learned.”

1 comment:

Vidya Devaiah said...

I believe that being able to communicate well is at the heart of being an excellent lawyer. I mean, what's the use of knowing the law, if you can't present your analysis and arguments in a clear and persuasive way? I don't know why this all isn't just common sense. Be brief; be clear; follow the rules of punctuation and grammar. This seems so simple, but hardly anyone does it.

Vidya Devaiah
SDD Global Solutions